§ 52.1174 Control strategy: Ozone.  


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  • (a) Part D—Conditional Approval—Michigan Rules 336.1603 and 336.1606 are approved provided that the following conditions are satisfied:

    (1) Rule 336.1606—The State either promulgates a rule with a 120,000 gallon per year throughput exemption for gasoline dispensing facilities for sources located in Wayne, Macomb and Oakland Counties. The State must either submit the rule to USEPA or demonstrate that the allowable emissions resulting from the application of its existing rule with 250,000 gallon per year throughput exemption for gasoline dispensing facilities are less than five percent greater than the allowable emissions resulting from the application of the CTG presumptive norm. The State must comply with this condition by May 6, 1981, and any necessary regulations must be finally promulgated by the State and submitted to USEPA by September 30, 1981.

    (b) Approval—On November 16, 1992, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources submitted Natural Resources Commission Rule 336.202 (Rule 2), Sections 5 and 14a of the 1965 Air Pollution Act 348, and the 1991 Michigan Air Pollution Reporting Forms, Reference Tables, and General Instructions as the States emission statement program. Natural Resources Commission Rule 336.202 (Rule 2) became effective November 11, 1986. Section 5 and 14a of the 1965 Air Pollution Act 348 became effective July 23, 1965. These rules have been incorporated by reference at 40 CFR 52.1170(c)(93). On October 25, 1993, the State submitted the 1993 Michigan Air Pollution Reporting Forms, Reference Tables, and General Instructions, along with an implementation strategy for the State's emission statement program.

    (c)(1) Approval—On January 5, 1993, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources submitted a revision to the ozone State Implementation Plan (SIP) for the 1990 base year inventory. The inventory was submitted by the State of Michigan to satisfy Federal requirements under section 182(a)(1) of the Clean Air Act as amended in 1990 (the Act), as a revision to the ozone SIP for the Grand Rapids and Muskegon areas in Michigan designated nonattainment, classified as moderate. These areas include counties of Muskegon, and the two county Grand Rapids area (which are the counties of Kent and Ottawa).

    (2) Approval—On November 12, 1993, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources submitted a petition for exemption from the oxides of nitrogen requirements of the Clean Air Act for the Detroit-Ann Arbor ozone nonattainment area. The submittal pertained to the exemption from the oxides of nitrogen requirements for conformity, inspection and maintenance, reasonably available control technology, and new source review. These are required by sections 176(c), 182(b)(4), and 182(f) of the 1990 amended Clean Air Act, respectively.

    (d) In a letter addressed to David Kee, EPA, dated March 30, 1994, Dennis M. Drake, State of Michigan, stated:

    (1) Michigan has not developed RACT regulations for the following industrial source categories, which have been addressed in Control Techniques Guidance (CTG) documents published prior to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, because no affected sources are located in the moderate nonattainment counties:

    (i) Large petroleum dry cleaners;

    (ii) SOCMI air oxidation processes;

    (iii) High-density polyethylene and polypropylene resin manufacturing; and

    (iv) Pneumatic rubber tire manufacturing.

    (2) (Reserved)

    (e) Approval—On July 1, 1994, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources submitted a petition for exemption from the oxides of nitrogen requirements of the Clean Air Act for the East Lansing ozone nonattainment area. The submittal pertained to the exemption from the oxides of nitrogen requirements for conformity and new source review. Theses are required by sections 176(c) and 182(f) of the 1990 amended Clean Air Act, respectively. If a violation of the ozone standard occurs in the East Lansing ozone nonattainment area, the exemption shall no longer apply.

    (f) Approval—On July 8, 1994, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources submitted a petition for exemption from the oxides of nitrogen requirements of the Clean Air Act for the Genesee County ozone nonattainment area. The submittal pertained to the exemption from the oxides of nitrogen requirements for conformity and new source review. These are required by sections 176(c) and 182(f) of the 1990 amended Clean Air Act, respectively. If a violation of the ozone standard occurs in the Genesee County ozone nonattainment area, the exemption shall no longer apply.

    (g) [Reserved]

    (h) Approval—On January 5, 1993, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources submitted a revision to the ozone State Implementation Plan for the 1990 base year emission inventory. The inventory was submitted by the State of Michigan to satisfy Federal requirements under section 182(a)(1) of the Clean Air Act as amended in 1990, as a revision to the ozone State Implementation Plan for the Detroit-Ann Arbor moderate ozone nonattainment area. This area includes Livingston, Macomb, Monroe, Oakland, St. Clair, Washtenaw, and Wayne counties.

    (i) Approval—On November 12, 1993, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources submitted a request to redesignate the Detroit-Ann Arbor (consisting of Livingston, Macomb, Monroe, Oakland, St. Clair, Washtenaw, and Wayne counties) ozone nonattainment area to attainment for ozone. As part of the redesignation request, the State submitted a maintenance plan as required by 175A of the Clean Air Act, as amended in 1990. Elements of the section 175A maintenance plan include a base year (1993 attainment year) emission inventory for NOX and VOC, a demonstration of maintenance of the ozone NAAQS with projected emission inventories (including interim years) to the year 2005 for NOX and VOC, a plan to verify continued attainment, a contingency plan, and an obligation to submit a subsequent maintenance plan revision in 8 years as required by the Clean Air Act. If the area records a violation of the ozone NAAQS (which must be confirmed by the State), Michigan will implement one or more appropriate contingency measure(s) which are contained in the contingency plan. Appropriateness of a contingency measure will be determined by an urban airshed modeling analysis. The Governor or his designee will select the contingency measure(s) to be implemented based on the analysis and the MDNR's recommendation. The menu of contingency measures includes basic motor vehicle inspection and maintenance program upgrades, Stage I vapor recovery expansion, Stage II vapor recovery, intensified RACT for degreasing operations, NOX RACT, and RVP reduction to 7.8 psi. The redesignation request and maintenance plan meet the redesignation requirements in sections 107(d)(3)(E) and 175A of the Act as amended in 1990, respectively. The redesignation meets the Federal requirements of section 182(a)(1) of the Clean Air Act as a revision to the Michigan Ozone State Implementation Plan for the above mentioned counties.

    (j) [Reserved]

    (k) Determination—USEPA is determining that, as of July 20, 1995, the Grand Rapids and Muskegon ozone nonattainment areas have attained the ozone standard and that the reasonable further progress and attainment demonstration requirements of section 182(b)(1) and related requirements of section 172(c)(9) of the Clean Air Act do not apply to the areas for so long as the areas do not monitor any violations of the ozone standard. If a violation of the ozone NAAQS is monitored in either the Grand Rapids or Muskegon ozone nonattainment area, the determination shall no longer apply for the area that experiences the violation.

    (l) Approval—EPA is approving the section 182(f) oxides of nitrogen (NOX) reasonably available control technology (RACT), new source review (NSR), vehicle inspection/maintenance (I/M), and general conformity exemptions for the Grand Rapids (Kent and Ottawa Counties) and Muskegon (Muskegon County) moderate nonattainment areas as requested by the States of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Wisconsin in a July 13, 1994 submittal. This approval also covers the exemption of NOX transportation and general conformity requirements of section 176(c) for the Counties of Allegan, Barry, Bay, Berrien, Branch, Calhoun, Cass, Clinton, Eaton, Gratiot, Genesee, Hillsdale, Ingham, Ionia, Jackson, Kalamazoo, Lenawee, Midland, Montcalm, St. Joseph, Saginaw, Shiawasse, and Van Buren.

    (m) Approval—On November 24, 1994, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources submitted a revision to the ozone State Implementation Plan. The submittal pertained to a plan for the implementation and enforcement of the Federal transportation conformity requirements at the State or local level in accordance with 40 CFR part 51, subpart T—Conformity to State or Federal Implementation Plans of Transportation Plans, Programs, and Projects Developed, Funded or Approved Under Title 23 U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Act.

    (n) Approval—On November 29, 1994, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources submitted a revision to the ozone State Implementation Plan for general conformity rules. The general conformity SIP revisions enable the State of Michigan to implement and enforce the Federal general conformity requirements in the nonattainment or maintenance areas at the State or local level in accordance with 40 CFR part 93, subpart B—Determining Conformity of General Federal Actions to State or Federal Implementation Plans.

    (o) Approval—On March 9, 1996, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality submitted a request to redesignate the Grand Rapids ozone nonattainment area (consisting of Kent and Ottawa Counties) to attainment for ozone. As part of the redesignation request, the State submitted a maintenance plan as required by 175A of the Clean Air Act, as amended in 1990. Elements of the section 175A maintenance plan include an attainment emission inventory for NOX and VOC, a demonstration of maintenance of the ozone NAAQS with projected emission inventories to the year 2007 for NOX and VOC, a plan to verify continued attainment, a contingency plan, and a commitment to submit a subsequent maintenance plan revision in 8 years as required by the Clean Air Act. If a violation of the ozone NAAQS, determined not to be attributable to transport from upwind areas, is monitored, Michigan will implement one or more appropriate contingency measure(s) contained in the contingency plan. Once a violation of the ozone NAAQS is recorded, the State will notify EPA, review the data for quality assurance, and conduct a technical analysis, including an analysis of meteorological conditions leading up to and during the exceedances contributing to the violation, to determine local culpability. This preliminary analysis will be submitted to EPA and subjected to public review and comment. The State will solicit and consider EPA's technical advice and analysis before making a final determination on the cause of the violation. The Governor or his designee will select the contingency measure(s) to be implemented within 6 months of a monitored violation attributable to ozone and ozone precursors from the Grand Rapids area. The menu of contingency measures includes a motor vehicle inspection and maintenance program, Stage II vapor recovery, RVP reduction to 7.8 psi, RACT on major non-CTG VOC sources in the categories of coating of plastics, coating of wood furniture, and industrial cleaning solvents. The redesignation request and maintenance plan meet the redesignation requirements in section 107(d)(3)(E) and 175A of the Act as amended in 1990, respectively. The redesignation meets the Federal requirements of section 182(a)(1) of the Clean Air Act as a revision to the Michigan Ozone State Implementation Plan for the above mentioned counties.

    (p) Approval—On November 22, 1995 the Michigan Department of Natural Resources submitted a petition for exemption from transportation conformity requirements for the Muskegon ozone nonattainment area. This approval exempts the Muskegon ozone nonattainment area from transportation conformity requirements under section 182(b)(1) of the Clean Air Act. If a violation of the ozone standard occurs in the Muskegon County ozone nonattainment area, the exemption shall no longer apply.

    (q) Correction of approved plan—Michigan air quality Administrative Rule, R336.1901 (Rule 901)—Air Contaminant or Water Vapor, has been removed from the approved plan pursuant to section 110(k)(6) of the Clean Air Act (as amended in 1990).

    (r) Approval—On March 9, 1995, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality submitted a request to redesignate the Muskegon County ozone nonattainment area to attainment. As part of the redesignation request, the State submitted a maintenance plan as required by 175A of the Clean Air Act, as amended in 1990. Elements of the section 175A maintenance plan include a contingency plan, and an obligation to submit a subsequent maintenance plan revision in 8 years as required by the Clean Air Act. If the area records a violation of the 1-hour ozone NAAQS, determined not to be attributable to transport from upwind areas, Michigan will implement one or more appropriate contingency measure(s) which are in the contingency plan. The menu of contingency measures includes a motor vehicle inspection and maintenance program, stage II vapor recovery, a low Reid vapor pressure gasoline program, and rules for industrial cleanup solvents, plastic parts coating, and wood furniture coating.

    (s) Approval—On May 9, 2000, the State of Michigan submitted a revision to the Michigan State Implementation Plan for ozone containing a section 175A maintenance plan for the Flint and Saginaw-Midland-Bay City areas as part of Michigan's request to redesignate the areas from nonattainment to attainment for ozone. Elements of the section 175A maintenance plan include a contingency plan, and an obligation to submit a subsequent maintenance plan revision in 8 years as required by the Clean Air Act. If monitors in any of these areas record a violation of the ozone NAAQS (which must be confirmed by the State), Michigan will adopt, submit to EPA, and implement one or more appropriate contingency measure(s) which are in the contingency plan and will submit a full maintenance plan under section 175A of the Clean Air Act. The menu of contingency measures includes a low Reid vapor pressure gasoline program, stage I gasoline vapor recovery, and rules for industrial cleanup solvents, plastic parts coating, and wood furniture coating.

    (t) Approval—On March 9, 1995, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality submitted a request to redesignate the Allegan County ozone nonattainment area to attainment. As part of the redesignation request, the State submitted a maintenance plan as required by 175A of the Clean Air Act, as amended in 1990. Elements of the section 175A maintenance plan include a contingency plan, and an obligation to submit a subsequent maintenance plan revision in 8 years as required by the Clean Air Act. If the area records a violation of the 1-hour ozone NAAQS, determined not to be attributable to transport from upwind areas, Michigan will implement one or more appropriate contingency measure(s) which are in the contingency plan. The menu of contingency measures includes rules for plastic parts coating, wood furniture coating, and gasoline loading (Stage I vapor recovery).

    (u) Approval—On March 22, 2001, Michigan submitted a revision to the ozone maintenance plan for the Muskegon County area. The revision consists of allocating a portion of the Muskegon County area's Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) and Oxides of Nitrogen (NOX) safety margin to the transportation conformity Motor Vehicle Emission Budget (MVEB). The MVEB for transportation conformity purposes for the Muskegon County area are now: 8.5 tons per day of VOC emissions and 10.2 tons per day of NOX emissions for the year 2010. This approval only changes the VOC and NOX transportation conformity MVEB for Muskegon County.

    (v) Approval—On December 19, 2003, Michigan submitted an update to the Section 175(A) maintenance plan for the Southeast Michigan 1-hour ozone maintenance area, which consists of Livingston, Macomb, Monroe, Oakland, St. Clair, Washtenaw, and Wayne counties. This update addresses the second 10-year period of maintenance of the ozone standard in Southeast Michigan, which spans the years 2005 through 2015. The maintenance plan also revises the Motor Vehicle Emissions Budget (MVEB). For the year 2005, the MVEB for VOC is 218.1 tons per day (tpd), and the MVEB for NOX is 412.9 tpd. For the year 2015, the MVEB for VOC is 172.8 tpd, and the MVEB for NOX is 412.9 tpd.

    (w) Approval—On June 17, 2005, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality submitted a petition requesting the exemption from Clean Air Act oxides of nitrogen control requirements in six 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas. The Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo/Battle Creek, Lansing/East Lansing, Benzie County, Huron County, and Mason County nonattainment areas each receive an exemption. Section 182(f) of the 1990 amended Clean Air Act authorizes the exceptions. The exemption will no longer apply in an area if it experiences a violation of the 8-hour ozone standard.

    (x) Approval—On May 9, 2006, Michigan submitted requests to redesignate the Grand Rapids (Kent and Ottawa Counties), Kalamazoo-Battle Creek (Calhoun, Kalamazoo, and Van Buren Counties), Lansing-East Lansing (Clinton, Eaton, and Ingham Counties), Benzie County, Huron County, and Mason County areas to attainment of the 8-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). The State supplemented its redesignation requests on May 26, 2006, and August 25, 2006. As part of its redesignation requests, the State submitted maintenance plans as required by section 175A of the Clean Air Act. Elements of the section 175 maintenance plan include a contingency plan and an obligation to submit subsequent maintenance plan revisions in 8 years as required by the Clean Air Act. If monitors in any of these areas record a violation of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS, Michigan will adopt and implement one or more contingency measures. The list of possible contingency measures includes: Lower Reid vapor pressure gasoline requirements; reduced volatile organic compound (VOC) content in architectural, industrial, and maintenance coatings rule; auto body refinisher self-certification audit program; reduced VOC degreasing rule; transit improvements; diesel retrofit program; reduced VOC content in commercial and consumer products rule; and a program to reduce idling. Also included in the Michigan's submittal were motor vehicle emission budgets (MVEBs) for use to determine transportation conformity in the areas. For the Grand Rapids area, the 2018 MVEBs are 40.70 tpd for VOC and 97.87 tpd for oxides of nitrogen (NOX). For the Kalamazoo-Battle Creek area, the 2018 MVEBs are 29.67 tpd for VOC and 54.36 tpd for NOX. For the Lansing-East Lansing area, the 2018 MVEBs are 28.32 tpd for VOC and 53.07 tpd for NOX. For the Benzie County area, the 2018 MVEBs are 2.24 tpd for VOC and 1.99 tpd for NOX. For the Huron County area, the 2018 MVEBs are 2.34 tpd for VOC and 7.53 tpd for NOX. For the Mason County area, the 2018 MVEBs are 1.81 tpd for VOC and 2.99 tpd for NOX.

    (y) Approval—On June 13, 2006, Michigan submitted requests to redesignate the Flint (Genesee and Lapeer Counties), Muskegon (Muskegon County), Benton Harbor (Berrien County), and Cass County areas to attainment of the 8-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). The State supplemented its redesignation requests on August 25, 2006, and November 30, 2006. As part of its redesignation requests, the State submitted maintenance plans as required by section 175A of the Clean Air Act. Elements of the section 175 maintenance plan include a contingency plan and an obligation to submit subsequent maintenance plan revisions in 8 years as required by the Clean Air Act. If monitors in any of these areas record a violation of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS, Michigan will adopt and implement one or more contingency measures. The list of possible contingency measures includes: Lower Reid vapor pressure gasoline requirements; reduced volatile organic compound (VOC) content in architectural, industrial, and maintenance coatings rule; auto body refinisher self-certification audit program; reduced VOC degreasing rule; transit improvements; diesel retrofit program; reduced VOC content in commercial and consumer products rule; and a program to reduce idling. Also included in the Michigan's submittal were motor vehicle emission budgets (MVEBs) for use to determine transportation conformity in the areas. For the Flint area, the 2018 MVEBs are 25.68 tpd for VOC and 37.99 tpd for oxides of nitrogen (NOX). For the Muskegon area, the 2018 MVEBs are 6.67 tpd for VOC and 11.00 tpd for NOX. For the Benton Harbor area, the 2018 MVEBs are 9.16 tpd for VOC and 15.19 tpd for NOX. For the Cass County area, the 2018 MVEBs are 2.76 tpd for VOC and 3.40 tpd for NOX.

    (z) Approval—On March 6, 2009, Michigan submitted a request to redesignate the Detroit-Ann Arbor area (Lenawee, Livingston, Macomb, Monroe, Oakland, St. Clair, Washtenaw, and Wayne Counties) to attainment of the 1997 8-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). As part of its redesignation requests, the State submitted a maintenance plan as required by section 175A of the Clean Air Act. Elements of the section 175 maintenance plan include a contingency plan and an obligation to submit subsequent maintenance plan revisions in 8 years as required by the Clean Air Act. If monitors in any of these areas record a violation of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS, Michigan will adopt and implement one or more contingency measures. The list of possible contingency measures includes: Reduced VOC content in architectural, industrial, and maintenance (AIM) coatings rule; auto body refinisher self-certification audit program; reduced VOC degreasing/solvent cleaning rule; diesel retrofit program; reduced idling program; portable fuel container replacement rule; and, food preparation flame broiler control rule. Also included in the Michigan's submittal were a 2005 base year emissions inventory and motor vehicle emission budgets (MVEBs) for use to determine transportation conformity in the area. For the Detroit-Ann Arbor area, Michigan has established separate MVEBS for the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments (SEMCOG) region (Livingston, Macomb, Monroe, Oakland, St. Clair, Washtenaw, and Wayne Counties) and for Lenawee County. MDEQ has determined the 2020 MVEBs for the SEMCOG region to be 106 tons per day for VOC and 274 tpd for NOX. MDEQ has determined the 2020 MVEBs for Lenawee County to be 2.1 tpd for VOC and 4.4 tpd for NOX.

    [45 FR 58528, Sept. 4, 1980]

[45 FR 58528, Sept. 4, 1980