2018-12134. Endangered Species; Recovery Permit Applications  

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    AGENCY:

    Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.

    ACTION:

    Notice of receipt of permit applications; request for comment.

    SUMMARY:

    We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, invite the public to comment on the following applications to conduct certain activities with endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (ESA) prohibits activities with listed species unless a Federal permit is issued that allows such activities. The ESA requires that we invite public comment before issuing these permits.

    DATES:

    We must receive written data or comments on the applications at the address given in ADDRESSES by July 6, 2018.

    ADDRESSES:

    Reviewing Documents: Documents and other information submitted with the applications are available for review, subject to the requirements of the Privacy Act and Freedom of Information Act. Submit a request for a copy of such documents to Karen Marlowe, 404-679-7097 (telephone) or 404-679-7081 (fax); karen_marlowe@fws.gov.

    Submitting Comments: If you wish to comment, you may submit comments by any one of the following methods:

    • U.S. mail or hand-delivery: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Regional Office, Ecological Services, 1875 Century Boulevard, Atlanta, GA 30345 (Attn: Karen Marlowe, Permit Coordinator).
    • Email: permitsR4ES@fws.gov. Please include your name and return address in your email message. If you do not receive a confirmation from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that we have received your email message, contact us directly at the telephone number listed in FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT.
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    FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:

    Karen Marlowe, Permit Coordinator, 404-679-7097 (telephone) or 404-679-7081 (fax).

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    SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

    We invite review and comment from local, State, and Federal agencies and the public on applications we have received for permits to conduct certain activities with endangered and threatened species under section 10(a)(1)(A) of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (ESA; 16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), and our regulations in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at 50 CFR part 17. With some exceptions, the ESA prohibits activities that constitute take of listed species unless a Federal permit is issued that allows such activities. The ESA's definition of “take” includes hunting, shooting, harming, wounding, or killing and also such activities as pursuing, harassing, trapping, capturing, or collecting.Start Printed Page 26299

    A recovery permit issued by us under section 10(a)(1)(A) of the ESA authorizes the permittee to conduct activities with endangered or threatened species for scientific purposes that promote recovery or for enhancement of propagation or survival of the species. These activities often include such prohibited actions as capture and collection. Our regulations implementing section 10(a)(1)(A) for these permits are found at 50 CFR 17.22 for endangered wildlife species, 50 CFR 17.32 for threatened wildlife species, 50 CFR 17.62 for endangered plant species, and 50 CFR 17.72 for threatened plant species.

    Permit Applications Available for Review and Comment

    Proposed activities in the following permit requests are for the recovery and enhancement of propagation or survival of the species in the wild. The ESA requires that we invite public comment before issuing these permits. Accordingly, we invite local, State, Tribal, and Federal agencies and the public to submit written data, views, or arguments with respect to these applications. The comments and recommendations that will be most useful and likely to influence agency decisions are those supported by quantitative information or studies.

    Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so.

    Permit application No.ApplicantSpecies/numbersLocationActivityType of takePermit action
    TE 065972-2U.S. Forest Service, Russellville, ARGray bat (Myotis grisescens), Indiana bat (M. sodalis), northern long-eared bat (M. septentrionalis), Ozark big-eared bat (Corynorhinus (=Plecotus) townsendii ingens), and American burying beetle (Nicrophorus americanus)Ozark-St. Francis National Forest lands, ArkansasPresence/absence surveysBats: Enter hibernacula and maternity roost caves, capture with mist nets, handle, identify, and release. American burying beetle: live-trap and releaseRenewal and Amendment.
    TE 171493-2Memphis Zoo, Memphis, TNDusky gopher frog (Rana sevosa)In captivity at Memphis Zoo, Memphis, TN; Toronto Zoo, Ontario, Canada; and, Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo, Omaha, NE. In the wild in Harrison County, MississippiGenetic diversity study of captive frogs and post-release survival and movement of captive-bred frogsCollect toe clips from captive-bred frogs; attach radio-transmitters to monitor post-release survival and movements of captive-bred metamorphsRenewal and Amendment.
    TE 237535-3Bok Tower Gardens, Lake Wales, FLDicerandra christmanii (Garrett's mint), Warea carteri (Carter's mustard), and Lupinus aridorum (Scrub lupine)Lake Wales National Wildlife Refuge, FloridaEx situ seed banking, artificial propagation, seed germination and storage research, and population augmentationRemove and reduce to possession (collect) seeds and leavesRenewal.
    TE 53149B-2Hans Otto, Tucson, AZGray bat (Myotis grisescens), Indiana bat (M. sodalis), Northern long-eared bat (M. septentrionalis), Ozark big-eared bat (Corynorhinus townsendii ingens), Virginia big-eared bat (C. t. virginianus), Lesser long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris curasoae yerbabuenae), and New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus)Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and WyomingPresence/absence surveys and scientific researchLesser long-nosed bat: mist-net, harp trap, hand-net, band, radio-tag, light tag, collect hair samples, collect oral swabs, and wing punch. Other bats: enter hibernacula or maternity roost caves, salvage dead bats, capture with mist nets or harp traps, handle, identify, collect hair samples, band, radio tag, light tag, collect fecal material, apply fungal lift tape, swab, and wing punch. New Mexico jumping mouse: live-trap, handle, and releaseRenewal.
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    TE 41910B-2Scott Rush, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MSGray bat (Myotis grisescens), Indiana bat (M. sodalis), Northern long-eared bat (M. septentrionalis), and Gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus)Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, and TennesseePresence/absence surveys and scientific researchBats: Capture with mist nets or harp traps, handle, identify, and collect hair samples. Gopher tortoise: scope burrows, capture, handle, mark, attach transmitters, and attach GPS loggersRenewal and Amendment.
    TE 75551C-0Phillip Arant, Lexington, KYGray bat (Myotis grisescens), Indiana bat (M. sodalis), and Northern long-eared bat (M. septentrionalis)Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and WyomingPresence/absence surveysCapture with mist-nets or harp traps, handle, identify, band, and radio-tagNew.
    TE 54578B-2Mary Frazer, Raleigh, NCGray bat (Myotis grisescens), Indiana bat (M. sodalis), Northern long-eared bat (M. septentrionalis), and Virginia big-eared bat (Corynorhinus townsendii virginianus)Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York. North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and WyomingPresence/absence surveys, studies to document habitat use, population monitoring, and to evaluate potential impacts of white-nose syndrome or other threatsEnter hibernacula or maternity roost caves, salvage dead bats, capture with mist nets or harp traps, handle, identify, collect hair samples, band, radio tag, light-tag, and wing-punchRenewal.
    TE 63633A-5Biodiversity Research Institute, Portland, MEGray bat (Myotis grisescens), Indiana bat (M. sodalis), and Northern long-eared bat (M. septentrionalis)Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and WyomingPresence/absence surveys, studies to document habitat use, population monitoring, and to evaluate potential impacts of white-nose syndrome or other threatsEnter hibernacula or maternity roost caves, salvage dead bats, capture with mist nets or harp traps, handle, identify, collect hair samples, band, radio tag, and wing-punchRenewal.
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    TE 75560C-0Jeffrey Hawkins, Richmond, KYGray bat (Myotis grisescens), Indiana bat (M. sodalis), Northern long-eared bat (M. septentrionalis), Ozark big-eared bat (Corynorhinus townsendii ingens), Virginia big-eared bat (C. t. virginianus), blackside dace (Phoxinus cumberlandensis), and 36 species of freshwater musselsAlabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and WyomingPresence/absence surveys, studies to document habitat use, population monitoring, and to evaluate potential impacts of white-nose syndrome or other threatsBats: Enter hibernacula or maternity roost caves, salvage dead bats, capture with mist nets or harp traps, handle, identify, collect hair samples, band, radio tag, light-tag, swab, and wing-punch. Fish and Mussels: Capture, identify, and releaseNew.
    TE 76455C-0North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NCBartram's hairstreak butterfly (Strymon acis bartrami), Florida leafwing butterfly (Anaea troglodyta floridalis), Miami blue butterfly (Cyclargus (=Hemiargus) thomasi bethunebakeri), and Schaus swallowtail butterfly (Heraclides aristodemus ponceanus)FloridaScientific research on survival rates of various life stagesLocate eggs, monitor and measure caterpillars, enclose host plants, release emerging butterflies, and salvage of parasitized eggs and larvaeNew.
    TE 77197C-0U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Little Rock, ARAmerican burying beetle (Nicrophorus americanus)Logan County, ArkansasPresence/absence surveys and population monitoringLive-trap and releaseNew.
    TE 77472C-0Stream Techs, LLC, Athens, GAAmber darter (Percina antesella), Etowah darter (Etheostoma etowahae), Gulf moccasinshell (Medionidus penicillatus), Oval pigtoe (Pleurobema pyriforme), and Shinyrayed pocketbook (Lampsilis subangulata)GeorgiaPresence/absence surveysCapture, handle, identify, and releaseNew.
    TE 88797B-1Amber Nolder, Luthersburg, PAGray bat (Myotis grisescens)Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Virginia, and West VirginiaPresence/absence surveys and studies to document habitat useCapture with mist nets and harp traps, handle, identify, band, mark with non-toxic paint, and radio-tagAmendment.
    TE 824723-10Reed Bowman, Archbold Biological Station, Venus, FLFlorida grasshopper sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum floridanus)FloridaPredator control, nest monitoring, disease screening, emergency actions associated with severe weather, and captive propagationFire ant control around nest sites, installation of predator exclusion fences on nests, installation of nest cameras, collection of blood samples, raising nests to reduce mortality associated with flooding, cross-fostering of eggs and nestlings, and collection of eggs, nestlings, juveniles, and adultsAmendment.
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    TE 78383C-0Joel Casto, Crawfordville, FLRed-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis)Apalachicola National Forest FloridaPopulation monitoring, population management, and translocationCapture, band, translocate, monitor nest cavities, install and monitor artificial nest cavities, and install restrictorsNew.
    TE 32397A-3James Godwin, Auburn University, Auburn, ALBlack Warrior waterdog (Necturus alabamensis)AlabamaPresence/absence surveys, genetic analyses, population analysisCapture, handle, identify, and collect tissue sample (tail tip)Amendment.
    TE 37886B-1Civil & Environmental Consultants, Inc., Franklin, TNNashville crayfish (Orconectes shoupi)TennesseePresence/absence surveysCapture, handle, identify, and releaseRenewal.
    TE 096554-4James Robinson, Lexington, KYBlackside dace (Phoxinus cumberlandensis), Cumberland darter (Etheostoma susanae), and Kentucky arrow darter (Etheostoma spilotum)Kentucky and TennesseePresence/absence surveysCapture, handle, identify, and releaseRenewal and Amendment.
    TE 100012-3Michael Reynolds, Share the Beach, Gulf Shores, ALGreen sea turtle (Chelonia mydas), Kemp's ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys kempi), and Loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta)Baldwin and Mobile Counties, AlabamaMonitor and protect nestsLocate, monitor, excavate, and relocate nests; temporarily retain nestlings; and, release nestlingsRenewal.
    TE 102418-3Florida Army National Guard, Starke, FLRed-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis), Eastern indigo snake (Drymarchon corais couperi)Camp Blanding Joint Training Center, Starke, FLPresence/absence surveys and population managementRed-cockaded woodpecker: Monitor nest cavities, capture, band, release, and install artificial nest cavities. Eastern indigo snake: Scope burrows, capture, handle, and releaseRenewal and Amendment.
    TE 002507-6Florida Forest Service, Brooksville, FLRed-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis)FloridaPopulation management and monitoringCapture, band, translocate, monitor nest cavities, construct and monitor artificial nest cavities and restrictorsRenewal.
    TE 81202C-0Michael Maltba, Whitesburg, KYGray bat (Myotis grisescens), Indiana bat (M. sodalis), and Northern long-eared bat (M. septentrionalis)Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, and WisconsinPresence/absence surveys and studies to document habitat useEnter hibernacula and maternity roost caves, salvage dead bats, capture with mist nets and harp traps, handle, band, radio-tag, collect hair samples, wing-punch, and light-tagNew.
    TE 142294-5William Holimon, Little Rock, ARRed-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis)Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and TexasPopulation management and monitoringCapture, band, monitor nest cavities, construct and monitor artificial nest cavities and restrictors, and translocateRenewal.
    TE 027344-3Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest, Monticello, GARed-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis)Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest, GeorgiaPopulation management and monitoringMonitor nest cavities, and construct and monitor artificial nest cavities and restrictorsRenewal.
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    TE 84861C-0Power South Energy Cooperative, Andalusia, ALChoctaw bean (Villosa choctawensis), fuzzy pigtoe (Pleurobema strodeanum), narrow pigtoe (Fusconaia escambia), southern kidneyshell (Ptychobranchus jonesi), and southern sandshell (Hamiota australis)AlabamaPresence/absence surveysRemove from the substrate, handle, identify, return to substrate, and salvage relic shellsNew.
    TE 61981B-3The Peregrine Fund, Boise, IDPuerto Rican sharp-shinned hawk (Accipiter striatus venator)Puerto RicoCaptive propagation and reintroductionCollect eggs and nestlings for captive propagationAmendment.
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    Authority: We provide this notice under the authority of section 10(c) of the ESA.

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    Aaron Valenta,

    Acting Assistant Regional Director, Ecological Services, Southeast Region.

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    [FR Doc. 2018-12134 Filed 6-5-18; 8:45 am]

    BILLING CODE 4333-15-P

Document Information

Published:
06/06/2018
Department:
Interior Department
Agency:
Fish and Wildlife Service
EntryType:
Notice
Action:
Notice of receipt of permit applications; request for comment.
Document Number:
2018-12134
Dates:
We must receive written data or comments on the applications at
Pages:
26298-26303 (6 pages)
Docket Numbers:
FWS-R4-ES-2018-N072, FXES11140400000-189-FF04E00000
SectionNoes:
PDF File:
2018-12134.pdf